• A model performer who is far too advanced my be used. This could lead to:
    • Setting unrealistic goals/targets
    • Loss of motivation as the level of performance may seem too far out of reach

  • It may not be possible to get model performance data for a particular activity
    • No standard test scores for athlete of a particular sport
    • Difficulty finding appropriate video clips of athletes performing skills
    • Lack of “normal data” from athletes completing mental/emotional/social questionnaires

  • Time spent gathering data on model performance may be disproportionate to the benfits

  • Poor model performance may be used for comparison. This could be for a number of reasons:
    • There are many clips on the Internet claiming to be created by “experts”. These may give false information and lead to the development of errors in performance
    • An athlete could be a model performer in relation to certain aspects of their performance but not a model in other. E.g. Mario Balotelli may provide a model performance of skills in football but not self-conduct.

  • All athletes are different – what works for some may not be the correct approach for other. This could result in an athlete trying to use an approach that is not suitable for them.

  • By only referring to model performance there is little room for innovative approaches. If Dick Fosbury had only based his performance development on what the best high jumpers were doing at the time he would not have used his approach. This would have meant that the Fosbury flop would not be being used today.

  • The situation that the model performer is in may not be realistic for an amateur performer. For example a professional athlete may have a lot of time and help in order to mentally prepare for a performance whereas an amateur performer may have to juggle their sport along with family and work demands.